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Posts for: August, 2019

By Advanced Dental Concepts
August 28, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
LadyGagaWasntBornThisWay

Sometimes, looking at old pictures can really bring memories back to life. Just ask Stefani Germanotta—the pop diva better known as Lady Gaga. In one scene from the recent documentary Five Foot Two, as family members sort through headshots from her teen years, her father proclaims: "Here, this proves she had braces!"

"If I had kept that gap, then I would have even more problems with Madonna," Lady Gaga replies, referencing an ongoing feud between the two musical celebrities.

The photos of Gaga's teenage smile reveal that the singer of hits like "Born This Way" once had a noticeable gap (which dentists call a diastema) between her front teeth. This condition is common in children, but often becomes less conspicuous with age. It isn't necessarily a problem: Lots of well-known people have extra space in their smiles, including ex-football player and TV host Michael Strahan, actress Anna Paquin…and fellow pop superstar Madonna. It hasn't hurt any of their careers.

Yet others would prefer a smile without the gap. Fortunately, diastema in children is generally not difficult to fix. One of the easiest ways to do so is with traditional braces or clear aligners. These orthodontic appliances, usually worn for a period of months, can actually move the teeth into positions that look more pleasing in the smile and function better in the bite. For many people, orthodontic treatment is a part of their emergence from adolescence into adulthood.

Braces and aligners, along with other specialized orthodontic appliances, can also remedy many bite problems besides diastema. They can correct misaligned teeth and spacing irregularities, fix overbites and underbites, and take care of numerous other types of malocclusions (bite problems).

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that kids get screened for orthodontic problems at age 7. Even if an issue is found, most won't get treatment at this age—but in some instances, it's possible that early intervention can save a great deal of time, money and effort later. For example, while the jaw is still developing, its growth can be guided with special appliances that can make future orthodontic treatment go quicker and easier.

Yet orthodontics isn't just for children—adults can wear braces too! As long as teeth and gums are healthy, there's no upper age limit on orthodontic treatment. Instead of traditional silver braces, many adults choose tooth-colored braces or clear aligners to complement their more professional appearance.

So if your child is at the age where screening is recommended—or if you're unhappy with your own smile—ask us whether orthodontics could help. But if you get into a rivalry with Madonna…you're on your own.

If you have questions about orthodontic treatment, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Magic of Orthodontics” and “Orthodontics For The Older Adult.”


By Advanced Dental Concepts
August 18, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Nutrition   oral health  
4DietChangesYouShouldMakeforBetterOralHealth

One of the most popular subjects in books, magazines and social media is food — the things we should or should not eat (or at least not too much). While losing weight is a popular focus, it's only one part of the whole — a balanced diet that supplies the nutrients we need to be healthy.

What you eat can also make a difference in your oral health. Here are 4 changes you should make to your dietary habits to cut down on the risk of dental disease.

Adopt a nutritionally sound diet plan. When we say diet, we're not talking about the latest weight-loss sensation — we mean a planned way of eating for life. For most people, that's a balanced diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, protein and dairy. Your teeth and gums have the best chance of remaining strong and healthy with a nutrient-rich diet.

Manage your sugar intake. Sugar and similar carbohydrates are a rich food source for bacteria that cause dental disease. It's important then that you keep your sugar consumption within limits: don't eat more than six teaspoons of processed sugar a day (or three for a child); avoid sugary snacks between meals; and try to satisfy your sweet tooth with the natural sugars found in fresh fruits and vegetables.

Cut back on acidic beverages. Sodas, juices, sports and energy drinks are all the rage. They're also high in acid, which at chronic levels can soften and erode tooth enamel. So, try to drink them only at meal times and avoid sipping on them over long periods. And, if you're hydrating yourself after moderate work or exercise, try nature's perfect hydrator — water.

Avoid eating before bedtime. A good portion of the acid in our mouths after we eat can be neutralized by saliva. As we sleep, though, our saliva flow slows down and doesn't have the same buffering power as it does during the day. So, try not to eat as least an hour before you turn in for the night, especially foods with added sugar.

If you would like more information on nutrition and oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nutrition & Oral Health.”


By Advanced Dental Concepts
August 08, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   bad breath  
NationalFreshBreathDayRemindsUstoSeekOuttheSourceofBadBreath

Be sure to mark August 6 on your calendars—and not just because it's the day in 1661 when the Dutch sold Brazil to Portugal, or when President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act in 1965, or when the Ramones performed for the last time in 1996. August 6 also happens to be National Fresh Breath Day! But since fresh breath is important to us every day, we like to celebrate all month long.

Celebrating fresh breath might not seem as noteworthy as these other historical moments, but if you're a frequent halitosis (bad breath) sufferer, you know it can be downright embarrassing. More importantly, it could be a sign of a deeper health problem. It turns out there are a number of reasons why you might have bad breath. Here are the most common.

You're not adequately cleaning your mouth. Certain strains of bacteria are known for emitting volatile sulfur compounds, which give rise to that "rotten egg" smell and are a major component of bad breath. Because they feed on leftover sugars and proteins from food, you can keep them and their noxious odors at bay by brushing and flossing your teeth and brushing the broad surface of the tongue, a prime breeding ground for these bacteria.

You're not producing enough saliva. This unsung bodily fluid is a key part of good oral health. Besides helping to rinse the mouth of food particles after eating, saliva also fights odor-causing bacteria. If your mouth is dry because you're not producing enough saliva, bacteria can grow and create a number of oral health problems, including bad breath. You may be able to relieve chronic dry mouth and accompanying bad breath by using saliva-boosting agents or drinking more water. You should also talk to your doctor about any medications you're taking that might interfere with saliva production.

It could be caused by disease. Tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease naturally give rise to bad breath—but so can other diseases like diabetes, cancer or respiratory infections. As you're dealing with these other conditions, you may also need to contend with bad breath as a side effect. You can help reduce any disease-based odors by keeping up your daily oral hygiene, especially if you're undergoing treatment for a systemic condition. Obtaining treatment, particularly if you have tooth decay or gum disease, will help reduce these embarrassing foul odors.

National Fresh Breath Day may not share the same pedestal with other momentous August dates, but if it reminds you to keep your mouth clean and see your dentist regularly, fresh breath certainly deserves its own day.

If you would like more information about the causes and remedies for bad breath, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing” and “Dry Mouth.”